5 Hot Handpicked Kitchen Trends

The New Home Trends Institute delves into design trends, handpicking five hot kitchen trends for home buyers and sellers.
Modern kitchen interior white during the day

Bolder designs are trending, but if homeowners were given the choice to remodel, white is still the most desired color palette. Photo by Mark McCammon from Pexels

Each month, the New Home Trends Institute (NHTI) delivers a newsletter that alternates between three themes: design, consumer, and industry trends. This month’s edition delves into design—staying on top of what’s new and handpicking the highlights, so you don’t have to.

Here are five handpicked kitchen trends for home buyers and sellers.

DESIGN PULSE: 5 KITCHEN TRENDS

Trend 1: Eat-In Kitchen as a Space Saver

Contour eat-in kitchen modern
Contour, TRI Pointe Homes, Woodley Architecture Group, Pacific Dimensions Inc. (pdi). Photo courtesy New Home Trends Institute. Credit: Tsutsumida Pictures

Most (85%) homeowners would consider island seating in lieu of separate dining space in the kitchen. We’re seeing designers incorporate enhanced island dining into both attainable homes (to save space) and luxury homes (as an option).

Contour (seen above) offers the space-saving, drop-down island standard in their 1,414-square-foot Plan 1. Bringing the lower level to chair height makes island dining feel casual and comfortable.


Trend 2: White with Bold Accents

The Cay at Mariner Shore kitchen interior
The Cay at Mariner Shore, Shea Homes, ICEArc Architecture + Planning, CDC Designs. Photo courtesy New Home Trends Institute. Credit: PlanOmatic

Don’t say goodbye to white kitchens just yet.

Bolder designs are trending, but if homeowners were given the choice to remodel, white is still the most desired color palette for its practicality and ability to withstand the test of time. Designers are upping the “boldness” factor with colorful accents, statement lighting, and playful tile.


Trend 3: Shades of Blue

Villa Townhomes interior blue kitchen
Villa Townhomes at Walsh, Highland Homes, IBB Design Fine Furnishings. Photo courtesy New Home Trends Institute. Credit: Steve Chenn Photography

Despite the continued preference for white in the kitchen, designers are reporting a growing desire for bolder styles. To avoid hurting the longevity of the design, consider incorporating color into easier-to-swap areas like painting the island or lower cabinetry (versus full cabinetry).

If you’re building production homes, be cautious with how bold you go. When introducing color, blue is a safer bet. As seen here, certain shades of blue can be considered a neutral, while still adding a touch of fun.


Trend 4: Conceal Clutter with Better Kitchen Storage

Carmel Cliff interior kitchen and dining room modern
Carmel Cliff, Pulte Homes. Photo courtesy New Home Trends Institute. Credit: Davies Imaging Group

Consumers rate kitchens as the number one space in the home to design right, with insufficient storage being the primary pain point. While open shelving may look nice for displaying decor, it takes precious space away from closed cabinetry that can conceal clutter.

Before considering open shelving, be sure to have sufficient cabinetry on the walls, within the island, or even extend into the dining area like at Carmel Cliff.


Trend 5: Quartz

West Village kitchen interior modern
West Village, Trumark Homes, Bassenian Lagoni, Rooms Interiors. Photo courtesy New Home Trends Institute. Credit: PlanOmatic

Quartz is the material of choice right now. According to John Burns Real Estate Consulting’s Kitchen and Bath Market Index, almost half of industry professionals reported seeing quartz increase in popularity among consumers in 2022 versus in 2021.

As an engineered stone, quartz does not need to be sealed, unlike porous surfaces like marble or granite. Engineered stones also allow for a broader selection of colors and patterns, making it easier to achieve stylistic preferences like a bright, white kitchen.


To learn more about each of these home collections check out DesignLens, a database of curated projects and design inspiration content. Features pair photo tours of production homes and master-planned communities with insights from builders, architects, and developers.